Alcoholism is both a physical and mental illness, which causes people to drink alcohol despite it resulting in negative consequences. It affects hundreds of thousands of people in the UK, and millions more around the world. Although not a curable illness, it can be effectively treated and managed with a programme of detoxification and rehabilitation.
Alcohol is known for lowering inhibitions, but when alcohol is combined with risky activities, such as driving/operating machinery or taking drugs (either prescription or recreational), this may be an indication that alcohol is being taken in at abusive levels. The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism warns that mixing alcohol with medication can cause internal bleeding and heart problems, as well as cause liver damage and make the medications toxic to the body.

Whether you’re seeking rehab for drug addiction alone or in conjunction with depression or any other mental disorder, you can find it with one of The Recovery Village’s locations. Although intake coordinators will ask you a list of questions when you call, keep in mind that you have the liberty to ask questions of your own to be sure you’re choosing the best facility to meet your needs. Knowing what to ask in advance and documenting the answers can help you be more prepared to make a confident decision about addiction recovery treatment.


Support groups are most useful as a long-term drug rehab program in that they can help hold former addicts accountable years after their treatment is complete. Patients find themselves surrounded by like-minded individuals who are in similar situations like the ones with which the patient is struggling. Many find it easier to discuss issues like temptation and family problems with others who understand.
In the case of expectant mothers who drink, future healthcare costs double, now including both the mother and child. For example, a child born with fetal alcohol syndrome could require special schooling. Not only is this a personal and unnecessary family tragedy but also it stands to impact the social system financially in the form of healthcare and education for years.
After physical dependency comes addiction. At this stage, you are drinking because you have a physical and psychological need to do so, and not for pleasure or because you want to. You will crave alcohol and it will be interfering with your ability to enjoy life. It is likely to be having a negative impact on your relationships with others as well as on your health and finances. Even knowing the harm that it is causing will not be able to stop. You will be compelled to drink and will be powerless to resist.

When it comes to recovering from drug addiction, there are many questions that may arise about the healing process, whether you’re the person struggling with addiction, or if you have a loved one who battles substance use. How do you know if you need help from a drug rehab center? What kind of drug rehab treatment is right for you? What can you expect from a drug addiction rehab center? This resource provides answers to some of your most important questions regarding rehab drug treatment, commonly abused drugs, the drug recovery process, and the various options for addiction help.

While a relapse or slip-up is by no means inevitable, you might face some setbacks during recovery. This does not have to mean returning to alcohol use. A lapse should not signify the end of your recovery, provided you act appropriately, in order to avoid a full relapse. You might even find that this small slip is enough to remind you of why you wanted to quit in the first place.
Before taking Antabuse you should give your doctor your entire medical history. You may not be a able to take Antabuse if you have a significant medical history of heart or blood vessel disease, diabetes, an underactive thyroid, brain disorders (e.g., seizures, brain damage), kidney disease, liver disease, a history of severe depression, a history of psychosis, or a history of suicide attempts. Antabuse can alter the metabolism and blood levels of certain drugs, especially tricyclic antidepressants, Dilantin (phenytoin), coumadin, isoniazid, and theophylline.
Stimulants, such as tobacco, cocaine or prescription amphetamines, stimulate the brain and nervous system, causing increased alertness. Depressants, such as barbiturates and benzodiazepines, slow activity in the brain and nervous system, causing relaxation. Hallucinogens, such as LSD and PCP, drastically disrupt the way the brain and nervous system communicate, causing hallucinations. Rehab: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO)
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