Treating addiction – whether at rehab or not – can be divided into three main phases. Firstly is detoxification, the process by which an addict’s system is cleansed of substances of abuse. Once this cleansing process has taken place, and the immediate pressures of drug dependency have been lifted, the addict will then need to address the psychological aspects of their addiction, including understanding the root causes and seeking to put measures in place to ensure that they do not stumble back into addiction by relapsing.
Research from NIAAA also suggests that alcoholism can stem from genes. While the specific “alcoholism gene” hasn’t yet been identified, there are known genes that can boost the power of alcohol and reduce the impact of a hangover. People with these gene combinations may get a bigger high from drinking, and they may not feel ill or sick after a long day of drinking. Their bodies just seem primed for alcohol abuse, and that can make them more likely to develop alcoholism.
Drug addiction is a growing concern in the United States. People often use drugs as an outlet for their problems, although drug use creates its own problems over time. Drug addiction not only affects a person’s health and relationships, but also impacts society and the environment. There are numerous treatment options to guide people toward a sober and healthy life.
Drug addiction isn’t always an instantly obvious problem; it often starts small. In fact, drug addiction sometimes begins with simple recreational use, or a “one-time” experiment, trying something new, or even a prescription for a much-needed painkiller after an accident or surgery. The trouble is that for some people—the ones who become addicted—the use of the addictive substance becomes frequent and a necessity.

The official diagnosis of drug addiction by the Diagnostic and Statistic Manual of Mental Disorders (2000), which makes distinctions between drug use, abuse, and substance dependence, is flawed. First, diagnosis of drug use versus abuse can be arbitrary and reflect cultural norms, not medical phenomena. Second, the term substance dependence implies that dependence is the primary pharmacologic phenomenon underlying addiction, which is likely not true, as tolerance, sensitization, and learning and memory also play central roles. It is ironic and unfortunate that the Manual avoids use of the term addiction, which provides the best description of the clinical syndrome.
This is an ongoing debate in the medical community, but it is generally agreed that there is no one cause for the development of addiction. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, contributing factors may include a genetic predisposition to develop addictive tendencies, an environment that is permissive of drug abuse, access to illicit substances, and certain developmental issues. The existence of a Dual Diagnosis is one of the biggest risk factors for the development of addiction. Heroin Withdrawal | First Week In
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