There is a strong correlation between alcohol abuse and violent crimes like assault, armed robbery, rape, and homicide. The U.S. Department of Justice reports that in up to half of all murders, the perpetrator consumed alcohol before committing the crime. Approximately 33 percent of sexual assault victims state that their assailant was under the influence of alcohol. In violent crimes where alcohol is involved, up to 60 percent of victims are injured or killed.
The length of a rehab program can vary greatly, and largely depends on the needs of each individual. For some, a weekly outpatient program may suffice, while others may participate in inpatient care that lasts on average 30–40 days. You may ask yourself, “How does rehab work?” Like many things in life, long-term recovery is usually achieved with time and dedication. For some, this may include long-term inpatient drug rehab that involves staying on-site for an extended period of time. This can help some clients better regulate their recovery needs for sustained sobriety. These types of programs may also include sober living housing, which provides patients with a stable place to live while transitioning back into normal life.
Getting alcohol out of the addicted person’s system is the first part of recovery. People with a severe alcohol addiction can experience intense withdrawal symptoms. A supervised alcohol detox is usually necessary for people addicted to alcohol to prevent potentially fatal complications. Shaking, sweating, seizures, and hallucinations are possible alcohol withdrawal symptoms. Woman Turns to Rehab After Struggling With Drugs, Alcohol: Part 1
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